Thursday, February 17, 2011

Veterans Park, Casper Wyoming






The memorial depicted above was originally across the street from City Park. It was removed to Veterans Park when a controversy about a Ten Commandments display, long in the park, brewed up due to outside agitators. At that time, the city, taking a look at the various memorials it had here and there, decided to consolidate them in the remodeled park.

This particular memorial contains an odd error in it in that a name on the memorial for a Korean War Marine is there in error. That particular individual was late in reporting back from a patrol late war, and listed as MIA. The creators of the memorial later presumed that he had died, and he was listed on the memorial, even though he did not die in the war, and may still be living.



This stone monument commemorates those who have died in the Middle Eastern and Central Asian Wars that have been fought since 1990.


Sign discussing the Korean War. Signs are present in the park for every widely recognized war fought by the United States since the Civil War.


This is the sign for World War One. This particular sign is unfortunately incomplete in terms of its information, as the sign maker was apparently unaware of the role of the Wyoming National Guard in the war. If you read the sign, you would be left with the impression that the Guard had little or no role, when in fact it was called up prior to the war for the Mexican border crisis, and it served as heavy artillery during World War One.

Indeed, the role of the Army National Guard is sadly lacking at this memorial in general, which is ironic given the strong presence of the Army National Guard in most Wyoming towns during the 20th Century, and the Air National Guard in Cheyenne. Only the Army National Guard's service in the Korean War is really featured in the park's displays.




A World War One trench mortar is on display at the park.

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